APDT Chronicle of the Dog Newsletter

Nov/Dec 2004, Vol. XI, No 6 Nanette Dittrick Member Profile, p. 10 2004 APDT Award Winners .... 19 2004 APDT Chronicle of the Dog Index .................................... 34 APDTAnnual Educational Conference 2004 .................... 20 Dog Parks: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly .......................... 1 Member Profile ......................... 10 Memorials ................................. 35 Pick of the Letter ..................... 25 President’s Message ................. 3 Research Review ................... 22 Reviewers’ Corner .................. 33 Training the Hunter/Retriever: An Emerging Challenge for Positive Trainers ............................... 16 What’s the Point? Beyond Clicker Training Animals .................. 13 THEASSOCIATION OF PET DOG TRAINERS, INC. 5096 SAND ROAD SE IOWACITY, IA 52240-8217 VOICE: 800-PET-DOGS E-MAIL: INFORMATION@APDT.COM WEB SITE: WWW.APDT.COM PRESIDENT Teoti Anderson, CPDT VICE PRESIDENT Lisa Wright, CPDT SECRETARY Mel Bussey, CPDT TREASURER Sue Pearson, CPDT FOUNDER Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS, CPDT Building Better Trainers Through Education Dog Parks: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly by Trish King, CPDT, CDBC with Terry Long, CPDT continued on page 5 I N S I D E 1 The APDT Chronicle of the Dog Nov/Dec 2003 hey’re called dog parks or dog runs. Sometimes they’re official, sometimes they’re formed by a group of people who want their dogs to play together. Some dog parks are large — acres or miles of paths — but most are less than an acre in size, and some are tiny. Some are flat gravel or dirt, while others have picnic tables, trees, and other objects. What all dog parks have in com- mon is the reason for their existence. Dogs (and their owners) need a place where they can run free, sans leashes, and do “doggie” things. Many of their owners have no yards and the dogs would otherwise spend their entire outdoor lives on leash. The fact that we even need dog parks is a reflection on American society, which is fragmented, with many people living solitary lives. Dogs and other pets are sometimes T T the only family an owner has. At the same time, municipal laws have been inexorably pushing dogs further and further away from acceptance in our culture. Thus, they’re seen as nui- sances by half the population, and as family by the other. In a perfect world, dog parks would not have to exist. Well-behaved dogs would have the privilege of being off leash (and well mannered!) in many different areas. However, the world is not perfect, and so we must make the best of what we have. Advantages of Dog Parks The advan- tages are simple and powerful. Dog parks provide a safe space in which people can exercise their dogs, and watch them play (something I love to do!) Our culture is becoming less and less tolerant of our canine companions, and often they are not welcome elsewhere At their best, dog parks can facilitate socialization with a variety of breeds “Adog park is like a cocktail party, where you don’t know anyone and everyone is drunk. You could have fun, but it could be a disaster.” Although many dog owners think all play is in good fun at dog parks, some dogs learn bullying play styles that can lead to other problems. Reprinted with permission of TheAssociation of Pet Dog Trainers, www.apdt.com , 1-800-PET-DOGS. Copyright 2004 The Association of Pet Dog Trainers. This article first appeared in the Nov/Dec 2004 issue of The APDT Chronicle of the Dog.

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NTkzMzk=